Thursday, 26 August 2010

The Faith Of A Child: Stefan G Lanfer

Preparing for fatherhood? Freaked out? Help is here.

Playwright Stefan Lanfer has penned a vital new book on the struggles of dads-to-be.

When a woman prepares for motherhood, other women guide her on her way. Not so a dad-to-be, who gets pats on the back, corny jokes, or vague assurances he'll do fine. Until now, his best hope was by-moms-for-moms baby books--a gap filled by Stefan Lanfer’s The Faith of a Child and Other Stories of Becoming and Being a Dad, in which the author chronicles his own journey to, and into fatherhood, lending a comforting and humorous peek into the vagaries and joys of being a dad.

According to Lanfer, "When my wife was pregnant, I was STRESSED out, and the guys around me were no help--until, just in time, I hosted a group of dads at our home. I fed them dinner, and they fed me their stories." As he listened, says Lanfer, "I got inside the head space of a dad, and, finally, I felt ready."

To pay forward this gift of stories, Lanfer shares his own in The Faith of a Child. To dads-to-be, Lanfer says, "If you want tips, tactics, and advice for childbirth and parenting, you've got dozens of choices. But, if you want real stories that actually let you picture fatherhood, The Faith of a Child is for you.



The Faith Of A Child is composed of a series of vignettes from Lanfer's life with his wife and, eventually, two small children. He writes in blank verse, which I didn't find particularly successful: his writing is neither tight enough nor lyrical enough to shine in this form (to see blank verse working well, read Sharp Teeth by Toby Barlow, a book I adore). And while he presents this as a book of stories to prepare men for fatherhood I'm not convinced that fathers will find the stories collected here at all useful: most are without any real resolution or message, and far too personal to Lanfer to inspire or instruct anyone else.

It's a shame, as there are occasional glimpses of beauty: for example, the title story is touching and rather lovely. But the few gems there are are muddied by Lanfer's rather unfocused style, and they're hidden among a lot of other stories which only invoked a reaction of "so what?" from me, I'm afraid.

A reasonable effort, then, let down by a lack of clarity and focus. While I think it's wonderful that the author finds his family life so compelling, he really needs to look at his stories with a harsher, more critical eye in order to recognise which are worth working on and which should be kept as a private, more personal record. I read thirty-two pages out of one hundred and fifty-five.

2 comments:

kathryn evans said...

How I wish I'd known about this blog a few years ago...I have a local history book that could have been a little gem. Sadly, the lovely man who commissioned it died and left no funds to see the project through. I knew it was a niche book, not something to take to mainstream publishers, so I printed through Lulu.Unfortunately, I had no idea when it came to editing and it painfully shows. It's the hardest thing to learn.
My little book did OK for what it is but I so wish I'd known then what I know now.

Stefan Lanfer said...

Thanks for spending time with my book and for the honest critique. Happy Holidays. One more vote to scrap the not quite poetry not quite prose style of this book with my next effort.